Today I took a Walk to Cry

Today I took a Walk to Cry

Today I took a walk just to cry

I cried for the pain I had seen
and for the pain I still felt

I cried because of the injustices
that I cannot make right

I cried for wounds so deep that they will never heal

I cried for scars left on the skin and on the soul

I cried in shame for the lies we share,
the ones we pretend are okay,
and the ones we deceive our self with by believe that none of the agony is
our fault.

I cried for those whose anguish follows them in all they do.

I cried for those whose nightmares cannot be comforted for they are real.

I cried for those who know nothing but terror,

And those who know nothing but brokenness – broken bodies, spirits and heart.

I cried alone…

I openly wept…

I fell to my knees

My shoulders shook.

I wanted to scream
to curse the world
To damn a society who allows such dismay to exist.

But I could only moan and sob.

There on my solitary walk in the woods tears streamed like a flowing river.

As I knew the would when I went on this walk just to cry.

And when I thought I had no more tears to shed I sat on the ground and saw in the distance a single flower.

A speck of yellow in the midst of the browns and grays of fallen pine straw and dead leaves.

And I shed another tear.

It was a tear of thanks for those who refuse to let those who suffer do so alone.

And another tear for the healers
and one for the peacemakers
and the counselors

And for those who comfort those who grieve.

For those whose mighty acts include wiping a brow, giving a sip of cold water to those who thirst, giving a warm embrace, and holding a trembling hand.

I wept in joy for those who stare evil in the face and proclaim your hate will not defeat my love.

For those who will not give up on the beloved community.

I cried for those who place semicolons where the world sees a period.

For those who make wholes in the darkness bringing light where there seemed to only be misery.

My souls anguish turned to grateful thanksgiving for those who rush towards the pain.

For those whose compassion heals shattered lives.

For those who don’t give up on the wounded and brokenhearted.

My heart was filled with awe for those who use the power of love to heal the world.

And finally, I was able to stand.

Cleansed and renewed by these waters; now able to raise my head high.

With new energy and joy, able to face life with faith, hope and love.

Clay Gunter

5/13/2018

Cooking Scrambled Eggs

Cooking Scrambled Eggs

I can see him still in his worn and faded overalls
Slowly cracking each egg
Placing them one by one in the bowl
Each slowly whisked together
A pinch of salt
A touch of pepper
A bit of milk
Deliberately mixed and then added to the pan
Its heat is so very low
And the stirring continues
So very gradually they cook
This old gentleman, with the little grey hair he has left, works at this job like every job I’ve ever seen him do
– unhurried
With a content smile
Consistency in his approach
His labor untroubled
The cooking finally completed even in that ultra-low heat
And alas they are delicious
Light and fluffy
Masterfully seasoned before they are ever plated
They melt in your mouth
They bring joy
Quite frankly are perfect

The eggs I cook are scrambled…
But often have a bit of shell included
Cooked in a hot pan
They are done quickly
There is little wait before you can eat
But they are dry
You better add seasoning before you taste
and alas
They bring little joy
The job is done…the meal prepared but…
Like most of my life they are done in a rush
and without a smile…
hurried along as “What’s Next” seems to be ever looming

The aged retired millworker, church sexton and lifelong farmer (and master breakfast maker) seems to know so much more about line than this man I am
– with my fancy certificates and degrees
Maybe the secret he whispers in his slow South Carolina drawl is to take it slow.
Be deliberate.
Perhaps the old man’s lesson to me – that I have never learned – is that the pleasure of life is found in the journey and not in crossing off “to do’s”

AND by choosing to really do the job right
…unhurried…
consistent…
with a slow, deliberate and gentle shuffle full of grace and not a flustered and panting sprint to be done

Only in living in the moment will joy indeed be realized
Hope appreciated
And life, love, and beauty fully savored

It’s a simple lesson that sadly I’ve been in too big a hurry to learn

My breakfast is done but not enjoyed
and my life is lived but not experienced
A life not well lived but hurried along as tasks are finished and a living accomplished
but the love of life lost…

Perhaps someday I will master this…
Unfortunately, there is no time to do it today…
Or is there?

Clay Gunter
August 2nd and 3rd, 2014 updated/completed 4/26/18

(In loving memory of Harold Foster – “Mr. Foster”)

Why I am No Longer Trying to be Happy – Seven Thoughts on Contentment

“I am not saying this because I am in need, for I have learned to be content whatever the circumstances. I know what it is to be in need, and I know what it is to have plenty. I have learned the secret of being content in any and every situation, whether well fed or hungry, whether living in plenty or in want. I can do all this through him who gives me strength.” Philippians 4:11-13 New International Version (NIV)

Why I am No Longer Trying to be Happy.

Seven Thoughts on Contentment

When asked about what they really want for their lives, many people will respond that they want to be happy.  And for a long time I would probably answer that question the same way.  However, I have discovered that while it sounds like a great answer, seeking happiness has some real problems.  Happiness is often subject to a variety of exterior factors.  This often makes happiness quite fleeting.

The dictionary defines happy as “delighted, please or glad, as over a particular thing.”  The problem is once that particular thing is gone, the happiness often disappears with it.  This leads to the emotional roller coasters on which most of us live our lives.  We continually move between ecstasy and agony.  While I recognize that some of this is unavoidable, I have come to realize that the issue is our attempt to seek this fleeting idea of being happy.  I am now no longer seeking happiness, but instead, I am trying to gain contentment.  Unlike happiness, contentment is defined as the state of being satisfied and having a mind at ease.

Contentment is not easy; in fact, it is often quite a struggle.  Happiness can appear out of nowhere.  Even people who consider themselves unlucky eventually have something good come along that makes them feel happy.  And most of us have those things come along quite regularly.  While the old adage might remind us that the sun does not shine on the same dog’s butt every day, it also reminds us that eventually the sun shines on everyone, no matter what we do or do not do.

However, contentment is different from this – it relies on no one but you.

As I have begun to recognize and struggle with this truth, I have discovered several rules that are helping me in my efforts to achieve contentment.  I hope by sharing them, they may help you to find a life of satisfaction where your mind is truly at these.

Please note that while I am phrasing these statements in terms of “you,” that these questions are the ones I ask myself daily.

  1. You are responsible for your own joy. No one can create your joyful life but you.  It is not up to your spouse or parents or siblings or friends or colleagues or boss or spiritual adviser.  It is up to you.  If you want a joy-filled life then it is up to you. Henri Nouwen reminds us that, “joy does not simply happen to us.  We have to choose joy and keep choosing it every day.”

What will be those things that bring you joy, again is up to you. Everyone finds joy in different area. Some find that joy in doing triathlons – that is not me. Others find it in gardening or music or cooking or in many other ways! The possibilities are limitless, and while I cannot even start to guess what your joys will be, I can offer one thing that I have always found to bring joy. This is the joy found in service to others. If you are not sure where to start in finding your own joy, start by simply giving of yourself. I assure you that it will bring joy.

And finding joy is the starting point for creating a life of contentment.

  1. You are responsible for your own growth. Your growth personally, professionally, and spiritually is up to you and your efforts. If you want to improve at your work, you need to find those professional development activities that will help you grow. If you want to be better at your hobby, then you need to practice and push yourself. Want to get closer to God? Then you must set aside time from prayer and scripture and worship.

As human beings, we are at our best when we are striving and growing. It is why we are explorers. It is why we are inventors. Contentment of the heart and soul means we are never content with where we are. Alas, we either grow or die.

  1. You are responsible for your own health and wellness. Exercise, proper nutrition, getting the sleep you need, brushing and flossing, getting checkups, taking prescribed medications, and taking time to engage in mindfulness are all up to you. Certainly there are supports available for all of these things both from others and even apps on your phone! However, at the end of the day it is up to you.

While an app can remind you to brush your teeth, doing so is up to you. Scheduling workouts is great but showing up and doing them requires your effort. Support groups and counseling require you to both show up and follow through with the advice.

The choice about all of this is yours and mine. In John’s Gospel, Jesus asked the paralyzed man if he wanted be well. I often imagine that question is one God is asking me. Do I really want to be well – if so I know what to do – the question is do I really want to do these things. Do I really want to be healthy enough to find contentment?

  1. You are responsible for how you see the world.

Are you grateful or are you bitter?

Do you see the glass as half full or half empty?

How you view life is up to you.

If you want to find the bad, it is always available.

I must admit this is probably the area I struggle with the most. I struggle with finding possibilities in the midst of problems. Yet I recognize this is a key area for my own growth.

Now I am not saying to go out and buy a set of rose-colored glasses. But finding the potential in times of troubles is what contentment is all about. Making choices to find hope is essential to a full life.

  1. You are responsible for creating your own vision. Too many people go around from day to day with no direction – no vision. Scripture reminds us that where there is no vision the people perish.

To find contentment you must find a vision, set goals, and create a plan. Your vision may change over time and it can be very simple. In fact, the speaker and author John Gordon encourages an individual’s visions to be just One Word. Whatever your vision is, make it easy to remember and worthy of your effort.

Having a vision will be a powerful step towards a contented life.

  1. You are responsible for being part of a culture that provides affirmation.

Business leaders often remind the managers they work with that “culture eats strategy for breakfast.” Without a culture that provides positive energy, your strategies will always struggle. A life of contentment will be difficult, if not impossible, to obtain.

You must find those people who help you to be your best. Those people will also bring you joy. They will help you see a hopeful future. It is as your parents said – choose your friends wisely.

Sadly, this will sometimes mean moving on from those who are hurtful and not helpful.

And sometimes it may be hard to find those who are on similar paths.

Nevertheless, just as a bad apple can spoil the bushel, one negative relationship can prove to be a disease on your soul.

  1. You are responsible for discovering your whys.

The whys are the big questions of your life. Often you will need to ask them again and again in order to find the bottom line real and truthful answer.

It is essential to keep asking why as you make decisions. If the answers fit your vision, help you grow, and bring you joy, then you are on the right track to helping find your state of contentment. If it does not, then odds are you need to do something else.

Contentment is like sitting on a quiet beach and watching the sunrise or rocking a newborn who has curled up in your arms. It is a feeling that you wish would never end.

This is what I encourage you to seek. It will bring peace to your life and allow you to face both good times and bad times with grace and hope and joy.

A Prayer about Medical Care

O Lord for those of us who complain about having to wait in rooms with heating and air, cushioned chairs, and big screen TV’s in order to see highly qualified doctors. While forgetting about the millions who will never see a physician. Forgive us.
 
We dread mammograms, colonoscopies, physicals and fasting blood work while the idea of preventative care is unknown to so many. And fasting overnight is not a choice but a condition of one’s life. O Lord forgive us.
 
We grumble about nurses waking us up in the night as they make their rounds to provide care while so many lie alone each night dying.
 
We object to orders to rest and heal and take our medication while so many will never heal from injuries to their bodies and wounds to their souls.
 
We whine about co-pays and deductibles while so many die each day from diseases that are curable if you only have the money.
 
O God have mercy on us.
 
Help us to be grateful for all the gifts we have been given.
 
Allow us opportunities to help those in need of care.
 
Give us the courage to advocate for those who have been forgotten
– for those whose pain we would rather not see.
– who cries we would rather not hear.
 
And as we remember the amazing grace we have be given – may we seek to share that grace in both our words and actions – so that your world might become one where all of your children are given the compassion that was demonstrated to us by your son Jesus Christ – in whose holy name we pray.
 
Clay Gunter
June 28, 2017

A Prayer for the End of the Day

As the sun falls on another day and the stars emerge from the darkness, Lord hear our prayer.

We have worked and we have tried.
We have sought and we have struggled.
We have won and lost.
We have seen victory.
And we have failed.
We have felt joy and sorrow.
We have laughed and we have cried.
And we have needed your grace.

So as we close the day.
We give thanks. We offer gratitude.
And we pray for you forgiveness.

Gives us now rest that we may wake to the beauty of anther day of your creation. May we wake to do your work in hopes that your will may be done.
Amen.

Clay Gunter
June 20, 2017

Year End Reflection Time

One of the things teachers ask students to do is to reflect on their learning. Sometimes that reflection happens at the end of a project or a unit of study or the course but teachers know that reflection is a key part of the learning cycle.

It often looks like this in real life: pre-assessment…set goals for learning…instruction and practice…assessment of learning… and reflection.

Now this process is not just one found in education. It is found in lots of places but with different terms like debriefing, project review, grading of product implementation, evaluation of programs, examination of business goals…or a number of other terms, but in the end, all of these are forms of reflection.

In fact, the Harvard Business Review recently shared research showing the power of reflection in the business world. At the conclusion of this study one researcher noted, “When we stop, reflect, and think about learning, we feel a greater sense of self-efficacy. We’re more motivated and we perform better afterward.” (http://hbswk.hbs.edu/item/reflecting-on-work-improves-job-performance)

According to my paraphrased Webster’s definition, reflection is serious thought about a topic, event or project that is written down or otherwise recorded/documented.

As important as reflection is, teachers may be the ones who practice it the most poorly. That is usually because they do not do it. Teachers are either feeling the pressure to move on to the next thing, or they are so tired by the end of the school year, that their only plan is a series of long naps alternating with “umbrella” drinks on a beach.

However, before both of these well-deserved things take place, I would strongly encourage all educators—teachers, counselors, and administrators—to spend some time in reflection. Doing so will allow you to grow and be even better in your work.

Additionally, if I could be so bold, I would like to suggest a few questions that you might use in this process. While the questions are important, the actual process and time spent on it is the key. In addition, you do need to write the answers down…though complete sentences are not required.

Ten Reflection Questions

1. Three great moments from the last school year were…
2. Three moments that were disappointing from the last school year were…
3. Three ways I grew in my job were…
4. Three areas that could be improved are…
5. A funny story I never want to forget from last year is…
6. A few activities that went really well last year are…
7. How I am I better now than I was a year ago? How can I build on this?
8. How have my ideas about my work changed over the last year?
9. What do I need help with to be better at or continue to grow at my craft?
10. What person(s) made a positive impact on me in my last year of work? Have I thanked them?